Beet Box

Call for Help!

96 Call for Help!
What a week...

Last Friday the farm got robbed.
On Wednesday the electric tractor threw a spark and died.
And yesterday our irrigation pump burned up.
Is Mercury in retrograde or something?! 


With all the sudden heat, we are scrambling today to source a new irrigation pump so we can get water on the field.

The closest replacement pump is in Wilsonville, OR.

If you or anyone you know is driving from the Portland area to the coast today and would be willing to pick up the pump for us, PLEASE TEXT ZOE ASAP at 541-551-0314.

We are happy to pay for courier services!

Thank you!

 
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Week 4 from Valley Flora!

Week 4 from Valley Flora!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser
In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
  • Happy Summer Harvest Basket
  • Valley Flora at the Coos Bay Farmers Market!
  • Still No Strawberries...
  • Honeydrops Tickets Going Fast - Get 'em quick!
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Your Share This Week:
  • Head lettuce
  • Broccolini
  • Broccoli
  • Bunch Carrots
  • Red Ursa Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Spinach
  • Fresh Thyme
On Rotation:*

Nothing this week...

*This means that some pickup sites will receive it this week; others in a future week.


Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.

The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your share next week (no promises!):
  • Chard or Mustard Greens
  • Cilantro or Basil
  • Arugula
  • Head Lettuce
  • Broccolini
  • Broccoli
  • Sugar Snap Peas
  • Carrots
  • Cabbage
For recipes and ideas, check out these links:
 
Valley Flora Recipe Wizard
Our own collection of recipes gathered over the years.
 
Epicurious
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
Full Belly Farm
Recipes from one of my favorite farms in California, pioneers of the organic movement since the 80s.

Farm Fresh to You
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient.
 
Helsing Junction Farm
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes geared toward CSA members.

 
Happy Summer Harvest Basket!
Somewhere behind a dense bank of fog last night the sun set at nine pm...and then, 24 minutes later, the 2017 summer solstice came and went - a bit anti-climatically here in Langlois where a light drizzle settled in to welcome summer. I suppose it was a fitting choice of weather, pairing well with our overall theme of ample moisture this year!

But dawn brought rosy light and clear skies and the promise of gale force north winds....summer MUST be here! I think the farm is finally feeling it. This week's harvest basket looks more like my idea of early summer: your first bunch of sweet carrots, a mound of broccolini AND a crown or two of heading broccoli. Our best efforts to pace the broccoli harvest appear to have been foiled by Mother Nature this year: the broccolini, which usually fills the totes for the first three weeks of June, is just now starting to pump - about a month late. And so are our first beds of heading broccoli, right on time = broccoli avalanche. I highly recommend using up some of your broccoli in this recipe (an old favorite from my vegetarian college days): Broccoli and Tofu in Spicy Peanut Sauce.

 
The little bundle of herbs in your tote is fresh thyme. It's one of our favorite all purpose herbs (we use it in marinades, salad dressings, throw whole sprigs into pots of rice and quinoa for seasoning, stuff it into roasting chickens, add it into marinara sauce, and more). It's great used either fresh or dried, so if it's too much all at once hang it up to dry or put it in a food dehydrator until it's crispy, then store it in an airtight container.

Next week I'm pretty sure you can look forward to sugar snap peas, cabbage, more broccoli, and maybe maybe maybe a basket of strawberries (come on sun!).
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Valley Flora at the Coos Bay Farmers Market!
Starting today, and hopefully continuing through the summer, Valley Flora produce will be available at the Wednesday Coos Bay Farmers Market, 9 am to 2 pm in downtown Coos Bay! Our friend and fellow farmer, Sean Johnson, has spearheaded a collaborative Langlois market table and will have his own Langlois Lockers pastured pork, Oregon Grassfed Beef from Joe Pestana, Ocean Harvest albacore from Tyler Long, pastured eggs from Candace Carnahan, and Valley Flora produce. If you're in the neighborhood, swing in on Sean today. He has some of the last bunches of asparagus for the season, as well as Abby's Greens, head lettuce, bunch greens, radishes, turnips, kohlrabi, broccoli, lettuce, and more!
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Still No Strawberries...
What a waiting game this year! The strawberry patch looks healthy and vigorous, and many of the plants are loaded with green fruit, but it's taking FOREVER for those berries to turn red. I'm sure the resident marauding six and seven year olds are not helping much (they are for the most part running feral on the farm these days, helping themselves to the pea and strawberry patches at whim). I'd like to think we'd be picking by next week, but we'll see what the weather dishes up in terms of sunshine and heat.

That being the case, there is still no u-pick. A few folks have driven out the farm on a u-pick mission only to be disappointed. If you are coming for u-pick it's always a good idea to email us a few days in advance to get a berry update, particularly if you are coming in the early or late part of our strawberry season, which in a normal year runs from June through September.
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Honeydrops Tickets are Going Fast - Get Yours ASAP!
 
The California Honeydrops Play Live at the Farm on July 12th!
We're thrilled the Honeydrops are coming back to the farm this summer with their R&B, blues and New Orleans style jazz tunes. We encourage you to buy your tickets ASAP from one of the outlets listed below; the show will sell out quickly.

Wednesday, July 12th

6:30-10:30

$25

Ticket Outlets:

Valley Flora Farmstand, Mothers, Langlois Market, Port Orford Co-Op

 

Details about the event:

The show will be held at Valley Flora Farm. Click here for directions to the farm.

This event is all-ages. Kids under 12 are free, but if you're bringing kiddos please plan to supervise them. We are a working farm and need kids and adults alike to respect the following guidelines: stay within the roped off area; stay off equipment; do not pick any crops; do not climb fences or trees.

The farm gate will open for ticketholders at 6:30 pm - no sooner. Please don't come early. The band will likely start up at around 7:30ish.

Parking will be available in our field across the street from the farmstand. Please park where instructed when you arrive. Carpooling is a great idea since parking is limited and the planet is already hot.

Great local food will be available for purchase at the event. Come hungry and plan to have dinner!

Bring your own lawn chair or picnic blanket. There is plenty of grass but no seating provided.

Bring your dancing shoes! Bare feet will do.....

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The Farmstand is Open for Summer!
Wednesdays & Saturdays from 9 am to 3 pm, rain or shine!

Fresh Produce & Berries
Homemade Jam & Hot Sauce

Copyright © 2017 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp

Week 3 from Valley Flora!

Week 3 from Valley Flora!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser


In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
 
  • Cooking Greens: Collards & Braising Mix
  • Celebrate Salad (and Salad Dressing!)
  • Coming Soon to a Harvest Basket Near You....
  • The California Honeydrops at the Farm July 12th!
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Your Share This Week:
  • Head lettuce
  • Cilantro
  • Collard Greens
  • Purple and White Kohlrabi
  • Braising Mix
  • Hakurei Turnips
On Rotation:*
  • Spinach
  • Broccolini
  • Pea shoots
*This means that some pickup sites will receive it this week; others in a future week.


Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.

The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your share next week (no promises!):
  • Kale
  • Cilantro
  • Spinach
  • Head Lettuce
  • Broccolini
  • Sugar Snap Peas?
  • Carrots?
  • Radishes?
For recipes and ideas, check out these links:
 
Valley Flora Recipe Wizard
Our own collection of recipes gathered over the years.
 
Epicurious
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
Full Belly Farm
Recipes from one of my favorite farms in California, pioneers of the organic movement since the 80s.

Farm Fresh to You
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient.
 
Helsing Junction Farm
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes geared toward CSA members.

 
Cooking Greens: Collards and Braising Mix
I promised a lot of leafy green-ness this month as we wait not-so-patiently for the rest of the rainbow to ripen up on the farm (strawberries, carrots, beets, etc). It's been coming at you in the form of bunched greens, head lettuce, spinach, arugula, and more. This week you'll see a bunch of collard greens in your tote, as well as a bag of braising mix (a combo of baby mustard greens and kale). Both are best cooked.

Collard greens are a southern staple, traditionally cooked for hours in pot with water and a ham hock, then served alongside cornbread and black-eyed peas. As much as I relish southern food, there's no need to boil them for hours; a light steam is all they need. They'll be bright green and tender, delicious with a drizzle of olive oil, salt and a splash of your favorite vinegar.

Braising mix is a great stir-fry ingredient. It's a little spicy so it'll add a tiny kick to your meal.
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Celebrate Salad (and Salad Dressing!)
We grow a lot of head lettuce on the farm, with the goal of putting it in the Harvest Baskets every week from June until November. It's one of my favorite crops to tend, in part because there is so much diversity in the lettuce family - so many varieties with so many different colors, shapes and textures. And I love to eat salad. Lots of it.

Like many things this season, we've gotten off to a slow and somewhat rocky start with head lettuce. The romaine has thrived, but our butterhead and leaf lettuces have struggled through this cold, wet spring. We also had to go to war with grubs known as Leatherbacks (the larvae of the common Cranefly or "mosquito hawk"), which feast on little transplants in a similar fashion to cutworms. We squished thousands of them to try to salvage our third lettuce planting, and also started using Bt, an organic soil-dwelling bacteria that works as a biological insecticide on caterpillars. We survived that onslaught and haven't seen any damage in subsequent plantings, whew. Never a dull moment...

As a result, you may not see big voluptuous heads of butterleaf for a few more weeks, but there is ample juicy romaine to be had. Combine that with some spinach, some Abby's greens (if you get a salad share), some sliced turnips, some peeled and sliced kohlrabi and voilá, you'll have all the rabbits in the neighborhood trying to get an invite to your dinner table.

The veggies are great, but we all know that half the pleasure of a salad is in the dressing. We make our own dressing and I thought I'd share a couple of my favorite recipes. They are good enough that Cleo and Uma, ages 6 and 2 now, both clamor for the salad course....or in the case of Uma, at least she'll drag romaine hearts through a puddle of dressing and suck it off :)

Caesar Dressing (perfect for all that crunchy romaine)
Tahini-Tamari Dressing (our house dressing)
Green Goddess Dressing (especially good when you have an abundance of fresh herbs in season)

 
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Coming Soon to a Harvest Basket Near You...
So far this has been an unprecedented season: we've never NOT had ripe strawberries by mid-June. We've never NOT had an abundance of broccolini by mid-June. We've never seen such light asparagus yields and such delayed chard.

That said, I feel like we are on the cusp of a produce avalanche. Every spring crop, from carrots to strawberries to snap peas to broccoli, seems to be on the verge of exploding. And when that happens - so long as I don't jinx it with this prediction - we're all going to have our work cut out for us: there will be a lot to eat all at once....and a lot to pick. I'd guess that within the next two weeks the color and texture of the harvest baskets will begin to shift notably: still lots of green, but punctuated by orange and red, and getting heavier. A lot can change in one short week on the farm, especially if the sun is shining for 16 hours a day! Enjoy the abundant greenery while it lasts! We are one short week from the summer solstice!
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The California Honeydrops Live at the Farm on July 12th!
We're thrilled the Honeydrops are coming back to the farm this summer with their R&B, blues and New Orleans style jazz tunes. We encourage you to buy your tickets ASAP from one of the outlets listed below; the show will sell out quickly.

Wednesday, July 12th

6:30-10:30

$25

Ticket Outlets:

Valley Flora Farmstand, Mothers, Langlois Market, Port Orford Co-Op

 

Details about the event:

The show will be held at Valley Flora Farm. Click here for directions to the farm.

This event is all-ages. Kids under 12 are free, but if you're bringing kiddos please plan to supervise them. We are a working farm and need kids and adults alike to respect the following guidelines: stay within the roped off area; stay off equipment; do not pick any crops; do not climb fences or trees.

The farm gate will open for ticketholders at 6:30 pm - no sooner. Please don't come early. The band will likely start up at around 7:30ish.

Parking will be available in our field across the street from the farmstand. Please park where instructed when you arrive. Carpooling is a great idea since parking is limited and the planet is already hot.

Great local food will be available for purchase at the event. Come hungry and plan to have dinner!

Bring your own lawn chair or picnic blanket. There is plenty of grass but no seating provided.

Bring your dancing shoes! Bare feet will do.....

-->
The Farmstand is Open for Summer!
Wednesdays & Saturdays from 9 am to 3 pm, rain or shine!

Fresh Produce & Berries
Homemade Jam & Hot Sauce

Copyright © 2017 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp

Week 2 from Valley Flora!

Week 2 from Valley Flora!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser


In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
 
  • Veggie Tips for the Week
  • Tamales this Week!
  • California Honeydrops at the Farm on July 12th!
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Your Share This Week:
  • Head lettuce
  • Artichokes
  • Lacinato Kale
  • Purple and White Kohlrabi
  • Mint
On Rotation:*
  • Spinach
  • Asparagus
  • Pea shoots
*This means that some pickup sites will receive it this week; others in a future week.


Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.


The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your share next week (no promises!):
  • Collards
  • Cilantro
  • Kohlrabi
  • Head Lettuce
  • Broccolini?
  • Braising Mix
  • Hakurei Turnips
  • Micro-mix, on rotation

For recipes and ideas, check out these links:
 
Valley Flora Recipe Wizard
Our own collection of recipes gathered over the years.
 
Epicurious
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
Full Belly Farm
Recipes from one of my favorite farms in California, pioneers of the organic movement since the 80s.

Farm Fresh to You
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient.
 
Helsing Junction Farm
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes geared toward CSA members.

 
Veggie Tips for the Week
I usually write this CSA newsletter on Wednesdays, mid-week, once we're knee-deep in whatever the week's harvest might be. The outline for the newsletter will take shape in my head on Tuesdays as I move around the farm picking and packing your week's share. It'll dawn on me that I need to tell you that most of our artichokes are baby chokes, that they barely have a hairy choke inside, and that you can eat almost the whole wonderful tender thing from the bottom up. Oh, and that even if you don't have a use for fresh oregano (or mint) you can dry it and use it as needed. And that you can cook up the leaves of those Hakurei turnips like mustard greens. And so many other little things that you may or may not figure out on your own.

But these first couple weeks I've been writing the newsletter on Monday, before I find myself in the field meditating on all the lovely specifics of the produce we are harvesting for you. Which means I forgot to tell you some things last week (see above re: artichokes and oregano and turnip greens). :-)

As for this week....

Kohlrabi: Those are the two bulbous things in your tote this week, one purple and one white, with a goofy topknot of leaves - a quirky spring/fall vegetable that's bringing a splash of color to your tote this week. You can eat every part of the plant (use the leaves like kale), but most of the culinary focus is on the bulb: peel it, slice it up and eat it raw. You can also steam, stir-fry, and sautee it, although I think it shines as a raw vegetable more. It'll keep for weeks in the fridge in a plastic bag.

Mint: As mentioned above, if you aren't going to toss it into your smoothie, muddle it in a cocktail or rub it on some unctuous leg of lamb, dry it for later. You can simply hang the bunch and wait until it's crispy, or put it in a food dehydrator at low temp. Once it's dry, crumble it up and store in a glass jar.

Lacinato Kale: The blue-green crinkled bumpy bunch of leaves are a popular variety of kale that we always refer to as "Lacinato," but it goes by a lot of other names: Dinosaur kale, black kale, Tuscan kale, Tuscan cabbage, Italian kale, flat black cabbage, palm tree kale, or black Tuscan palm. It's been grown for centuries in Tuscany and is a traditional ingredient in minestrone. You can steam it, sautee it, roast it into kale chips, put it in your smoothie, add it to pasta or soup, for juice it (for extra super powers!). Keeps for a week or so in a plastic bag in the fridge.

Pea Shoots: We started experimenting with micro greens and pea shoots in our greenhouse this winter (one of the positive developments that came out of the incessant rain that prevented us from getting outside). The little bag of pea tendrils that some of you are getting this week (others next week) is one of my new favorite things to grow and eat. They taste just like peas! (Which, by the way, are growing beautifully in the field and just began flowering....cross your fingers for sugar snaps in three weeks!). We've been eating these little pea shoots in our salads - so pretty and tasty - but you can also flash sautee them with a little olive oil and salt or eat them alongside a slab of fish or other meat. They'll keep for up to a week in the fridge.
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Tamales this Week!
The first tamale shares will be delivered this week, the week of June 5th. If you're a tamale member, look for your share in the marked blue cooler at your pickup site. All tamale shares are labeled, so be sure you grab the bag with your name on it!

To prepare your tamales, you can either steam them until they are soft and heated through, or microwave them for a few minutes. I like to eat them with a dollop of sour cream, some Cranky Baby hot sauce and avocado. A little extra melted cheese is never a bad thing in my world either....
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The California Honeydrops Live at the Farm on July 12th!
We're thrilled the Honeydrops are coming back to the farm this summer with their R&B, blues and New Orleans style jazz tunes. We encourage you to buy your tickets ASAP from one of the outlets listed below; the show will sell out quickly.

Wednesday, July 12th

6:30-10:30

$25

Ticket Outlets:

Valley Flora Farmstand, Mothers, Langlois Market, Port Orford Co-Op

 

Details about the event:

The show will be held at Valley Flora Farm. Click here for directions to the farm.

This event is all-ages. Kids under 12 are free, but if you're bringing kiddos please plan to supervise them. We are a working farm and need kids and adults alike to respect the following guidelines: stay within the roped off area; stay off equipment; do not pick any crops; do not climb fences or trees.

The farm gate will open for ticketholders at 6:30 pm - no sooner. Please don't come early. The band will likely start up at around 7:30ish.

Parking will be available in our field across the street from the farmstand. Please park where instructed when you arrive. Carpooling is a great idea since parking is limited and the planet is already hot.

Great local food will be available for purchase at the event. Come hungry and plan to have dinner!

Bring your own lawn chair or picnic blanket. There is plenty of grass but no seating provided.

Bring your dancing shoes! Bare feet will do.....

-->
The Farmstand is Open for Summer!
Wednesdays & Saturdays from 9 am to 3 pm

Copyright © 2017 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp

Week 1 from Valley Flora!

Week 1 from Valley Flora!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser


In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
  • CSA Kickoff!!!
  • What to do with your Veggies this Week!?
  • Cherry Tomato Plants
  • Tamales NEXT week!
  • Re-Use or Recycle those Plastic Bags!
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Your Share This Week:
  • Head lettuce
  • Artichokes
  • Pac Choi
  • Hakurei Turnips
  • Oregano
  • Cherry Tomato Plant
On Rotation:*
  • Arugula
  • Asparagus
*This means that some pickup sites will receive it this week; others in a future week.


Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.


The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your share next week (no promises!):
  • Lacinato Kale
  • Fresh Herbs
  • Kohlrabi
  • Head Lettuce
  • Artichokes
  • Asparagus
  • Spinach or Braising Mix
  • Radishes?
  • Micro-mix, on rotation

For recipes and ideas, check out these links:
 
Valley Flora Recipe Wizard
Our own collection of recipes gathered over the years.
 
Epicurious
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
Full Belly Farm
Recipes from one of my favorite farms in California, pioneers of the organic movement since the 80s.

Farm Fresh to You
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient
 
Helsing Junction Farm
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes

 

CSA Kickoff!
The first week of the CSA season is here at last!

Many of you are veteran CSA (community supported agriculture) members, some of you have just joined for the first time, but to everyone: Thanks for being a part of our CSA family this year!

I'm Zoë, one of the owner/farmers at Valley Flora, along with my mom, Bets, and my sister Abby. I want you to know right off the bat that you, our CSA members, constitute the backbone of our farm, and above all else, our top priority is filling the Harvest Baskets with top notch produce each week. That's the imperative that motivates us to grow over a 100 different kinds of veggies each season and to save the best for you. We also juggle our farmstand and sales to a bunch of stores and restaurants up and down the coast - but our CSA always gets first dibs, even when the asparagus is scarce (I can't tell you how many restaurants are begging for it right now, but nope, into the CSA totes it goes this week:)!!)

It's been a slow start for us this year due to the cold, wet spring, but miraculously we're kicking off the CSA season on time. I didn't want you all to miss out on artichoke season, which is at its peak right now, as well as asparagus and a few other fleeting crops that are ready this week. That said, we're not sitting flush in overly-abundant produce just yet, so the first few weeks might be leaner than in year's past. Not to worry, we'll make up any produce shortfall once we're swimming in sweet crunchy carrots, ripe strawberries, and all the rest. Those things are just a few weeks off. In the meantime, your weekly tote will look very green :)

If you haven't already, please familiarize yourself with your pickup location, time, and guidelines here. It's helpful to everyone - your fellow CSA members, your pickup site host, and your farmers - if you can get yourself oriented to the way our pickup system works (please orient your spouse, family and friends, too, if they will be picking up for you now and then). Most pick-up mix-ups happen when you send someone in your stead and they aren't familiar with the pickup protocol.

Just as importantly, please review your account to make sure you know what you should be picking up each week. Only take the items you have signed up for and paid for. Not everyone gets a salad share. Only some folks get eggs. Tamales happen once/month for a handful of people who have opted in on the Tamale Share. Be sure to read signs, check labels, and take the right food home with you each week! We do our best to make it easy and clear for you, but it will only work if you take the time to read those signs and labels. Thanks for your help on this one!

Also, not the most scintillating thing, but please read over our CSA Member Agreement, which outlines our mutual commitment to each other this season. Everyone agrees to this "contract" during the sign-up process on our website. Among other things, it explains our cancellation and refund policy in the event that you need to opt out at some point during the season. We never hope for this, but have learned it's better to spell it out just in case. Any questions about it, don't hesitate to email me!

We're delighted to have you on board, and so grateful for your decision to eat with us for the next seven months! Our family loves the culinary adventure of eating through the seasons each year, all the more because it's shared with you. From spring radishes and kohlrabi, to summer tomatoes and corn, to fall squash and romanesco, here we go, yummily!
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What do Do with your Veggies this Week!?
In years past I have usually included a recipe in the newsletter each week, but with the abundance of easy-to-find, delicious, online recipes I almost feel like my efforts are less needed these days. I will throw one in here and there when I can't resist this season, but I think for the most part I'm going to leave the recipes up to you (definitely check out the recipe links in the left sidebar for seasonal ideas organized by ingredient).

That said, I always try to offer a little bit of veggie hand-holding right out of the gate when our CSA season starts up. Many of you know and love Hakurei turnips (those white round roots) and pac choi (the pretty green vase-shaped rosettes), but it might be the first encounter for some. If you are a first timer, here are a few tips for the produce in your share this week:
  • Hakurei Turnips: Eat them raw! Slice them into salads or cut them up for dipping, or munch them like apples. You can sautee them as well, but I think their sweet, juicy, buttery goodness is best enjoyed with as little adulteration as possible.
  • Pac Choi: A great stir-fry ingredient. Also lovely lightly steamed or added last minute to a soup.
  • Artichokes: Also known as a highly sophisticated mayo/butter delivery system. The easiest preparation is to steam them whole (half hour for small ones, longer for larger ones) and then dip them into melted butter, mayo or a homemade aioli. Lately we've been steaming them, then cutting them in half and grilling or pan frying them with a little butter and Spike seasoning and/or grated parmesan.
  • Asparagus: Lightly steam (don't overcook!) or try roasting them at 450 degrees in the oven, tossed first with olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast until tender and a little crispy on the edges.
  • Arugula: A mildly spicy/nutty green that is great as a stand-alone salad, or as a bed of greens under meat/fish.
And don't forget that your fellow CSA members are a great source of ideas and inspiration. Ask for advice at your pickup site! If you don't like something, swap or give it to someone else! There will be a "free box" at every pickup site this year where you can leave items for others, and help yourself to what others have left.
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Cherry Tomato Plants
Not instantly edible, but loaded with the promise of sweet feasting come August: your very own cherry tomato plant. We don't grow cherry tomatoes for our CSA because we don't have enough labor to pick them in the summer/fall, and because our outdoor plantings have been ravaged by blight one too many times by a capricious summer rain. BUT, they are a wonderful and easy thing to grow in your garden or deck pot, and the rewards are well worth the little effort they require.

This variety is called SunOrange: a tangerine-orange cherry tomato with heavenly sweet-tart-tropical flavor, excellent texture, crack resistance and the ability to bear fruit well into the fall (we were still picking them outside at the end of October in my home garden in Langlois last year....and yes, I did just admit that I have a home garden, in addition to the farm. And yes, I am crazy.).

If I could only eat one variety of tomato in all the world, this would be it. Plus, cherry tomatoes are more willing to set fruit in cool, foggy weather - which we have plenty of around here in the summer. That being said, try to choose a protected spot for your plant where it gets good southern exposure and protection from the wind. Whether you're planting it in the ground or in a pot, bury it as deeply as possible - even up to the top set of leaves. Tomatoes are adventitious rooters, meaning they'll sprout roots from their stem wherever it's in contact with soil - so the more of the plant you bury initially, the bigger root system you'll have. Feed it a balanced organic fertilizer, water it in, and offer it a stake, wire cage, or string trellis to climb up.

Your plant will need water as it gets established (try not to get the leaves wet to reduce chance of disease). Harvest will be easier if you prune it along the way, too. Trim off lower leaves as it grows upward, saving all the flowering trusses for fruit production. If your plant is in the ground, you can dry farm it once the plant is established and a good size. Less water means more intensely flavored tomatoes, which most of us love.

With a little TLC, you should see ripe cherry tomatoes by late July or August. And if all goes well, you should have bucketloads by August and September. We eat them like candy, but also cut them in half and dry them for winter...even more like candy.

 
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Tamales NEXT Week!
The first tamale shares will be delivered NEXT week, the week of June 5th. If you are a tamale member, look for your share in the marked blue cooler at your pickup site!
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Re-Use or Recycle those Plastic Bags!
Members often ask me about the best way to store their produce. Most leafy things and root crops like to be in the fridge with high humidity - in a plastic bag ideally. That's not true of all crops, like tomatoes and winter squash and cured onions, for instance, but for most of the things you'll be getting this month the plastic-bag-in-the-fridge rule holds fast.

So when a member asked me whether she should use a brand new ziploc for every item, every week, my eyes grew wide, for I am a devout member of the Church of Plastic Bag Washers. Ziplocs have a multi-year lifespan in our household (I just washed one last night that said "Blueberries 2013"). Our ziplocs usually don't find their way out of use until they are torn or riddled with holes. At which point we stockpile them in a big bag and take them to Price N Pride in Bandon where they recycle plastic grocery bags for free (there's a big bin in the foyer). Other grocery stores do the same, which is a huge relief to my conscience given the plastic trash disaster in our oceans.

You always know when you are in the midst of a fellow bag washer, because our kitchens are all rigged with some kind of contraption for drying bags: clothespins on the hanging fruit basket; a mini-clothesline across the kitchen window; a mason jar weighted with pebbles with a bunch of chopsticks poking out of it; or a bonafide wooden-pronged, store-bought, plastic bag drying rack. And inevitably, there's usually a drift of bags on the counter, waiting to be washed (which is usually a constant source of nagging, one way or another, in a marriage).

Some people worry that it's unsanitary to re-use plastic bags. If a bag had greasy meat it in previously, or something rotten, I might concur. But for produce, we've never had a problem - probably in part because we wash our bags with hot water and soap in between uses. There was a study done in San Francisco after the city banned plastic bags in stores. People were reusing bags, just as the law had intended, but when researchers took swabs of the inside of people's bags, they found all kinds of things growing, including E.coli. Yuck. But the researchers determined that it was because those people weren't washing their bags with soap and hot water between uses, and particularly because they were re-using bags that had held meat and dairy products, without washing them.

The moral of the story: it's fantastic and safe to reuse your plastic bags, so long as you keep them clean - the way you would anything in your kitchen.

And if a bag reaches the point of no return, take it to your local supermarket to be recycled! The albatross in the Pacific Ocean will thank you!
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The Farmstand is Open for Summer!
Wednesdays & Saturdays from 9 am to 3 pm

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May Update!

May Update!
May Update from Valley Flora!
• Artichoke Season is On! •
Visit our Farmstand to stock up.
Spring Hours: Thursdays 9am-4pm

CSA Update!

In spite of the cold wet spring we are optimistic that we'll be starting our CSA season on time. Tentatively mark your calendar for the week of May 29th for the first week of CSA deliveries.

That means that if you pick up in Coos Bay or at the Farm your first pickup should be Wednesday, May 31!

If you pick up in Bandon or Port Orford your first pickup should be on Saturday, June 3.

We will email you by the end of next week to confirm our start date.

We can squeeze a couple more folks into our CSA program, so if you haven't signed up yet get on our website and reserve a Harvest Basket, salad share, egg share and/or tamale share!





What's Fresh at the Farmstand: Thursdays from 9 to 4
  • asparagus (at last!)
  • artichokes
  • chard & kale
  • micro-mix (pea shoots and baby mesclun mix)
  • radishes
  • hakurei turnips
  • potatoes
  • head lettuce
  • shallots
  • herbs

Farmstand offerings change each week. Come by and get a taste of what's in season on Floras Creek!

 

Hope to see you up the creek!

Yours truly,
The Florettes
WHEN & WHERE 1.5 miles up Floras Creek Road

Thursdays
9am-4pm
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Spring Update!

Spring Update!
A Spring update from Valley Flora....
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Spring Update from Zoë!
 
  • SUN in the forecast!
  • Farm News: Our new team!
  • Harvest Baskets Still Available!
  • Spring Farmstand Hours
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SUN in the Forecast!!!
In the springtime, the weather forecast rules my life...and my emotions. As you might imagine, we've all had to work hard to keep our chins up this spring in the face of relentless rain, windstorms, and cold temps. But there's relief on the horizon...nothing like 8 sunny cartoon icons in a row to buoy morale! Thank you Weather Underground!

In spite of the weather, we've managed to get creative with our field prep and still get plants and seeds in the ground. Things are growing remarkably well in spite of it all (best pea germination ever this year and all the early broccoli and greens are thriving!).

Crops like asparagus and artichokes are a whole month late, but that's good news for our Harvest Basket members who will get to share in more of the harvest come June.

Here's hoping the sun sticks around. I have a feeling we're about to shift into overdrive farming mode :)

A Few Harvest Baskets Still Available!
 
If you or someone you know is interested in getting a Harvest Basket this year, be in touch! We have a few more available for the season. Details on our website, or send an email with questions.

 
Spring Farmstand Hours
 
  • Every Thursday from 9-4
  • Self-serve honor system
  • Bring a check or small bills to pay
We currently have chard, herbs, potatoes, leeks, shallots, artichokes and asparagus. Head lettuce and root crops coming soon!
 
Farm News: Our New Team!
We have a few new faces coming on board to work with us this season and we're excited to introduce you to them as the season gets underway. Turns out, a couple of them are four-legged.
Meet Jack and Jill, a team of Belgian/Morgan crosses who are making their way to us this week from Amish country in Iowa to join our Belgian mare, Maude, to work on the farm. I'm excited down to my toes.
Copyright © 2017 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


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Spring Update!

Spring Update!
A Spring update from Valley Flora....
View this email in your browser
-->



Spring Update from Zoë!
 
  • SUN in the forecast!
  • Farm News: Our new team!
  • Harvest Baskets Still Available!
  • Spring Farmstand Hours
-->
SUN in the Forecast!!!
In the springtime, the weather forecast rules my life...and my emotions. As you might imagine, we've all had to work hard to keep our chins up this spring in the face of relentless rain, windstorms, and cold temps. But there's relief on the horizon...nothing like 8 sunny cartoon icons in a row to buoy morale! Thank you Weather Underground!

In spite of the weather, we've managed to get creative with our field prep and still get plants and seeds in the ground. Things are growing remarkably well in spite of it all (best pea germination ever this year and all the early broccoli and greens are thriving!).

Crops like asparagus and artichokes are a whole month late, but that's good news for our Harvest Basket members who will get to share in more of the harvest come June.

Here's hoping the sun sticks around. I have a feeling we're about to shift into overdrive farming mode :)

A Few Harvest Baskets Still Available!
 
If you or someone you know is interested in getting a Harvest Basket this year, be in touch! We have a few more available for the season. Details on our website, or send an email with questions.

 
Spring Farmstand Hours
 
  • Every Thursday from 9-4
  • Self-serve honor system
  • Bring a check or small bills to pay
We currently have chard, herbs, potatoes, leeks, shallots, artichokes and asparagus. Head lettuce and root crops coming soon!
 
Farm News: Our New Team!
We have a few new faces coming on board to work with us this season and we're excited to introduce you to them as the season gets underway. Turns out, a couple of them are four-legged.
Meet Jack and Jill, a team of Belgian/Morgan crosses who are making their way to us this week from Amish country in Iowa to join our Belgian mare, Maude, to work on the farm. I'm excited down to my toes.
Copyright © 2017 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


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Farmstand Opens NEXT Week!

Farmstand Opens NEXT Week!
The Valley Flora Farmstand Opens

NEXT WEEK - Thursday, April 13th!
• Farmstand bounty changes weekly with the season •
 


The Farmstand will open for Spring Hours on Thursday, April 13th!
 

The farmstand opening has been delayed by a rainy spring, but we plan to open NEXT WEEK! Our apologies to anyone who came to the farmstand today with high hopes for produce!
 

Spring Hours starting April 13th:

Thursdays, 9 to 4


You can look forward to asparagus, artichokes, chard, kale, herbs, potatoes and shallots. Head lettuce coming soon!





Remember, the spring

farmstand is self-serve

honor system. Please:
  • Write your items on the clipboard
  • Place payment in the slot on the side of the shed
  • Bring small bills or a personal check (no change is available most of the time)

Thanks for being a VF veggie fan!!!
 
Spring Veggies Here we Come!
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Sign Up Now for the 2017 CSA Season!

Sign Up Now for the 2017 CSA Season!
Sign Up Now for the 2017 CSA Season

with Valley Flora!
• A September Harvest Basket from Valley Flora •
 


Valley Flora has space available for the 2017 CSA season!
 

Get 28 weeks of fresh, seasonal produce direct from the farm, June through December!

Four convenient delivery locations.

Flexible payment plans, and we accept SNAP benefits as payment for CSA memberships.

Visit us online for more information and to sign up.


 





2017 CSA Offerings: 
  • Harvest Baskets
  • Abbys' Greens Salad Shares
  • Candace's Egg Shares
  • Juana's Tamale Shares
  • Farmstand Shares - New!


Click Here for 2017 Pricing and to Sign Up!

 

Harvest Baskets sell out, so don't delay. Reserve yours now!


Thanks for eating locally and supporting family farms!
 
Pick-up Locations in:
  • Port Orford
  • Bandon
  • Coos Bay
  • At the Farm
KEEP IN TOUCH
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