Beet Box

The LAST Week!

The LAST Week!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser
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In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
  • The Last Tote
  • Tamales This Week!
  • A Big Bang for your CSA Buck!
  • Final Farmstand: December 14th
  • Recipe of the Week: Abby's Homemade Pumpkin Pie
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Your Share This Week:
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Carrots
  • Beets
  • Kale or Collards
  • Green Cabbage
  • Parsnips
  • Yellow Finn Potatoes
  • Pie Pumpkin
  • Hakurei Turnips
Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.

The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your first share next June!
  • Head Lettuce
  • Strawberries
  • Radishes
  • Broccolini
  • Red Ursa Kale
  • Asparagus
  • Artichokes
  • Fresh Herbs

No Fruit Shares this Week

 
Valley Flora is on Facebook. Check in for periodic Farmstand and U-pick updates!
The Last Tote
It is always with mixed emotion that I write this final dispatch for the season: I relish the winter that lies ahead and the freedom it offers, and at the same time I'm already nostalgic for the comfortable, predictable rhythm of the harvest season, working side by side with Roberto and my family. We do have some much-awaited fun planned for the first part of January, which involves bolting a seat into our delivery van, strapping the carseats in, and road tripping down California Route 1 with surfboards and bicycles in tow (of course visiting a few farms along the way). Then home again lickety split to start in on the orchard pruning and seed ordering and 2017 CSA sign ups and, yes, by January 23rd putting the first tiny onion seeds into greenhouse trays and kicking off a whole new season. February brings a spate of farm conferences and meetings and more orchard pruning and lots of greenhouse seeding and then POP! before you know it the asparagus are up and the farmstand is open again and we're back in the saddle, like it or not.

Winter always feels the longest and most luxurious right now, in the moment before it's actually begun. But once we're in it, with the CSA season behind us, it's surprisingly just as busy as summer - in its own way.

As for our loyal comrades in good eating - all of you - I know this begins that part of the year that some of you dread, devoid of your weekly installment of fresh veg from VF. I heard it a few times from customers at the farmstand today who were lamenting the "Valley Flora deprivation season" soon to befall them. I know, and I'm sorry. Maybe someday we'll figure out how to go year round without burning out and losing our love for it. I'm doing some experiments with shoots and micro-greens to augment late fall/early spring harvests, and have had my head buried in seed catalogues each evening by the fire searching for more fun winter things to grow. My sister thinks I'm crazy, all that slogging through inclement winter weather in pursuit of some purple sprouting broccoli, and yeah, she's probably right, but I can't help it. 

This final tote of yours is loaded with storage crops - pretty much everything in there besides the fresh greens will hold for months in your fridge (except for the shallots which are best kept somewhere cool and dark and dry, not the fridge). With a little bit of rationing, you could still be enjoying some VF goodies in a month or two. AND, don't forget that our farmstand is open next Wednesday - so if you want to stock up on more potatoes or carrots or storage apples or onions or anything else, come see us from 10 to 2 on December 14th (if you're looking for big quantities of something, give me a heads up by email so I can be sure to have enough for you at next week's farmstand).

Thank you for another great season together, and for making this little farm hum.

 
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Tamales this Week!
The final round of tamales will be delivered this week, in addition to all special order Holiday Tamales. Please look for your share in the marked blue coolers at your pickup site. Enjoy!
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A Big Bang for your CSA Buck!
Each season we keep track of what goes into your tote each week and then tally up the value of all 28 totes, giving us a grand total for the value of the CSA share each year. We value everything in the share based on our farmstand prices, which tend to be similar or lower than the prices for organic produce in the grocery store (on the rare occasion that I find myself in a grocery store, I always love to do some price-spying in the produce aisle...I'm often astounded by what things cost, and the sad shape they're in). This year, the value of the CSA share came to $947.75. That means that had you purchased all of the food you received in your weekly tote from our farmstand, you would have paid $947.75 instead of $800 (equal to an 18% discount by subscribing to the CSA).

For anyone who is curious about the value of the share over the course of the 28 weeks, here's a breakdown. It illustrates the seasonal bell-curve, with lower value shares at the shoulders of the season and the highest value shares in the middle (late August/early September was a whopper this year).
As for next season, crop planning is already underway and we hope you'll join us for another 28 week adventure in seasonal eating. Priority sign-ups for all current CSA members will begin in late January 2017, so expect an email from us in the New Year! Thanks again for all your support. We wouldn't be here without you!
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Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through December 14th we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm. Our final farmstand for the 2016 season will be Wednesday, December 14th. Make sure you stock up on long-storing staples like onions, shallots, potatoes, carrots and apples before we close for winter!


 
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Recipe of the Week

Abby's Homemade Pumpkin Pie

from Abby's recipe box
Inspired by the pie pumpkin in your final share this week, I decided it was high time we shared my sister's world famous pie recipe with, er, the rest of the world. This is a staple wintertime treat in our family. If you don't have time to make a crust, just skip it - the pie filling is what it's all about!

Ingredients

2 cups baked and mashed pumpkin or squash
1.5 c cream
1/4 c brown sugar
1/2 c white sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp powdered ginger
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1/8 tsp cloves
2 eggs

Blend all ingredients together well and pour into a single crust (or if making a crustless pie, pour directly into pie pan).

Bake at 425 for 15 minutes then reduce heat to 350 and bake 45 minutes more until filling is set.

Serve with whipped cream!
For more recipes, check out these links - all of which are searchable by ingredient:
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/forum/4
Our own collection of recipes, where you can contribute and share your favorites
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/content/recipe-searcher
Our website’s recipe search engine, where you can hunt down recipes by ingredient
 
www.epicurious.com
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
http://info2.farmfreshtoyou.com/index.php?cmd=RE
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient
 
http://helsingfarmcsa.com/recipes.php
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes
Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through December 14th we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm.

Rain or shine!

Fresh Produce, Fruit, Herbs
and Homemade Jam & Hot Sauce

 

 
Copyright © 2016 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


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Week 27 of 28 from Valley Flora!

Week 27 of 28 from Valley Flora!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser
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In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
  • Tote Notes: Sunchokes
  • Final CSA Delivery NEXT Week
  • Tamales NEXT Week
  • Final Farmstand: December 14th
  • Recipe of the Week: Yellow Finn and Jerusalem Artichoke Latkes with Apple-Horseradish Mayo

 
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Your Share This Week:
  • Leeks
  • Carrots
  • Sugarloaf Chicory
  • Rainbow Chard
  • Kohlrabi
  • Celeriac
  • Sunchokes
  • Delicata Squash
On Rotation:
(This means that some pickup sites will receive it this week; others in a future week.)
  • Nothing this week
Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.

The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your final share next week:
  • Leeks
  • Carrots
  • Shallots
  • Kale
  • Beets
  • Green Cabbage?
  • Parsnips
  • Potatoes
  • Pie Pumpkin

No Fruit Shares this Week

 
Valley Flora is on Facebook. Check in for periodic Farmstand and U-pick updates!
Tote Notes
Sunchokes: Also known as Jerusalem Artichoke, sunroot, earth apple, and topinambour, the sunchoke is the tuberous below-ground part of a species of sunflower native to North America. Native Americans cultivated them as an important food source long before Europeans landed on American shores. The plants are prolific and easy to grow; one root can make up to 200 new tubers in a year. If you're more familiar with sunchokes as a garden ornamental than on your dinner plate, you know what I'm talking about: it's that sunflowery-looking plant you can't get rid of, no matter how many times you try to dig it up. A new one will sprout from the tiniest speck of remnant tuber and shoot up 12 feet high, shading out the rest of your garden in one short summer (I banished my sunchokes from my home garden to a brushy edge of the farm, from which we'll harvest a few hundred pounds of sunchokes this week. Of course, they still come up in my garden each spring despite all attempts to eradicate them there...).

That said, their tenacious growing spirit makes them an impressive food crop. They can be used lots of ways, cooked or raw: kind of like potatoes but with a sweeter, nuttier flavor. One of their claims to fame is that they're surprisingly low in starch and high in inulin, which makes them a healthy food for type 2 diabetics. For best results, eat your sunchokes steamed or fried (not boiled; they tend to get soft and mushy). Or, distill them into Jerusalem Artichoke brandy (that's what the Germans do with 90% of their sunchoke crop).

Here's the caveat: some people have a hard time digesting sunchokes because the inulin has to be metabolized by bacteria in the colon (it isn't broken down at all in the human stomach). This can cause wicked farts. I always advise our CSA members not to experiment with sunchokes on a first date, in case you're one of those people who gets gassy from jerusalem "fartichokes." Here's what one Englishman said of sunchokes in 1621:

...which way soever they be dressed and eaten, they stir and cause a filthy loathsome stinking wind within the body, thereby causing the belly to be pained and tormented, and are a meat more fit for swine than men...

How's that for a sales pitch for this week's featured vegetable?

Like we tell our five year old: You only have to take one bite. Just try it. It's ok if you don't like it, but you at least have to try it.

Unless, that is, you've already taken a bite, tried it, and gotten the farts. In which case, get a hold of big wine barrel that will keep your sunchokes from spreading and plant the tubers. Next fall you can dig them up and you'll have a 5 gallon bucket full of tubers to try to pass off on an innocent neighbor...that's what my mom did to me (yes, this is all her fault).
 
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Your Final CSA Delivery is NEXT Week!

This week, on the heels of Thanksgiving, we return to our usual Wednesday/Saturday delivery schedule.

Our final delivery of Harvest Baskets, eggs and tamales will be the week of December 5th.
  • If you pick up on Wednesday, your final pickup will be Wednesday, December 7th.
  • If you pick up on Saturday, your final pickup will be Saturday, December 10th.
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Tamales Delivered Next Week
We will be delivering all Tamale Shares next week, including any special order holiday tamales. Look for them in the marked blue coolers at your pickup site on December 7th or December 10th.
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Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through December 14th we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm. Our final farmstand for the 2016 season will be Wednesday, December 14th. Make sure you stock up on long-storing staples like onions, shallots, potatoes, carrots and apples before we close for winter!


 
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Recipe of the Week

Yellow Finn and Jerusalem Artichoke Latkes with Apple-Horseradish Mayo

adapted from epicurious.com
Makes 24 hors d'oeuvre servings

Ingredients

 
For the apple-horseradish mayonnaise:
1 (2-inch) piece fresh horseradish root, peeled and finely grated
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Pommery or Dijon mustard
1 cup mayonnaise
 
For the latkes:
3 pounds Yukon gold potatoes, peeled
1 pound Jerusalem artichokes, thoroughly washed
1 large yellow onion, peeled
3 large eggs, beaten
2 tablespoons minced fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/4 cup all-purpose flour, plus more as needed
About 1 1/2 cups vegetable oil for frying
Minced chives for garnish
 

Preparation

Make the apple-horseradish mayonnaise:
In a medium bowl, stir together the horseradish, applesauce, vinegar, mustard, and mayonnaise. Season with salt and pepper.

DO AHEAD: The sauce can be made and stored, in an airtight container in the refrigerator, up to 3 days.

Make the latkes:
Line a large bowl with a clean cloth napkin or lint-free kitchen towel.
 
Working in batches, use the larger side of a box grater or a food processor fitted with a grater attachment to coarsely grate the potatoes, Jerusalem artichokes, and onion. As they're grated, transfer the vegetables to the towel-lined bowl. Gather the corners of the towel and wring as much excess liquid as possible from the vegetables. Transfer the wrung vegetables to a dry mixing bowl. Add the egg and parsley and stir to combine. While stirring the mixture, gradually add the flour, stirring well to incorporate.
 
Line a large baking sheet with paper towels.
 
In a large sauté pan over moderately high heat, heat 1/4 inch of oil until hot but not smoking. Test the latke batter by frying a small amount of batter in the hot oil—it should hold together and not fall apart when flipped. If necessary, add additional flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, but try to add as little flour as possible to create light latkes.
 
Working in batches, drop 2-tablespoon-size dollops of batter into the hot oil and use the back of a spoon to press the batter into 1 1/2-inch diameter pancakes. Season with salt and pepper and fry until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Flip the latkes and continue frying until golden brown, about 2 minutes. As they finish cooking, transfer the latkes to the paper-towel-lined baking sheet.
 
To serve
Arrange the latkes on a large plate or platter and top with apple-horseradish mayonnaise. Sprinkle with minced chives and serve immediately.
 
For more recipes, check out these links - all of which are searchable by ingredient:
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/forum/4
Our own collection of recipes, where you can contribute and share your favorites
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/content/recipe-searcher
Our website’s recipe search engine, where you can hunt down recipes by ingredient
 
www.epicurious.com
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
http://info2.farmfreshtoyou.com/index.php?cmd=RE
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient
 
http://helsingfarmcsa.com/recipes.php
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes
Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through mid-December we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm.

Rain or shine!

Fresh Produce, Fruit, Herbs
and Homemade Jam & Hot Sauce

 

 
Copyright © 2016 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp
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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser
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In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
  • Grace
  • Tote Notes: Parsnips
  • Don't Forget your Tote Today!
  • Order Your Holiday Tamales!
  • Recipe of the Week: Butternut Squash Vegducken with Mushroom-Cranberry Stuffing

 
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Your Share This Week:
  • Yellow Onions
  • Carrots
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Rosemary & Thyme
  • Yellow Finn Potatoes
  • Celery
  • Parsnips
  • Delicata & Acorn or Sunshine Squash
On Rotation:
(This means that some pickup sites will receive it this week; others in a future week.)
  • Nothing this week
Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.

The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your share next week:
  • Leeks
  • Carrots
  • Chicory
  • Chard
  • Kohlrabi
  • Sunchokes
  • Delicata Squash
  • Celeriac

No Fruit Shares this Week

 
Valley Flora is on Facebook. Check in for periodic Farmstand and U-pick updates!
Grace
There is a lot of time to think when you're crouched in the mud snapping Brusses sprouts off the stalk or digging muddy carrots all afternoon. Suited up head to toe against the elements, hood drawn low against the rain, I've spent a lot of hours the past two weeks trying to fathom the great political gulf riving our country. Maybe it's because I'm a mother of two young girls. Maybe it's because I sense our beloved planet and species at a critical junction. One thing's certain: I know that I have never cared quite so much about our country.

For almost ten years I have intentionally left politics out of this newsletter - or at least mostly out of it - out of respect for our CSA members' diverse political persuasions. It's something I love about this calling: that Republican or Democrat, Christian or Muslim, we all eat, and the farm can be a place that nourishes and supports everyone equally. No matter what. Growing up in rural Curry County taught me a valuable thing about people early on: that you might vote differently than your neighbor, but pretty much 99% of everything else we share in common as human beings. We love our dogs. We love this place and the salmon that return to our rivers each fall. We all hope for good health. For the happiness and well-being of our kids. For a safe place to call home, for meaningful work, a sense of self-worth, and for community. And in this little CSA community of ours we share a love for good food. This is our common humanity. Just don't talk politics.

With the current political gulf so deep and hate-filled, with everyone's heels dug in so hard and deep, I have been mourning the the loss of that common humanity and grace. With families gathering for Thanksgiving this week, I wonder what kind of conversations will unfold over the millions of dinner tables across the country tomorrow, and will those conversations render the gulf deeper and wider? Will there be grace in the grace?

In light of that, I was moved by this quote I came across last week:
"...go wherever there is a wall, a conversation in the culture that is not happening – within ourselves, in our society, between one human cultural sect or belief or culture and another – and...open a conversation across that divide...We must turn now to each other, without exclusion, and ask “What am I not hearing, that you are trying and failing to get me to listen to?” and then “Where is it that I’m only comfortable in my own world, my own 'tribe'."

I read it and wondered if I've had it wrong all these years, the rule to "not talk politics." What if we did, but with our minds (and hearts) wide open? Could it be that our current predicament is due to all of us not talking to each other enough in a genuinely curious, open-minded way? If respectful disagreement were OK at the Thanksgiving table and everywhere, wouldn't we have some rolicking good conversations that would chip away at the stereotypes that smother our common humanity?

In Spanish, the translation for Happy Thanksgiving is "feliz día de acción de gracias," literally, happy day of action of giving thanks. Gracias, as in the Latin gratia, as in grace. I like thinking of it as a day of action (not just a day of eating too much and watching football). A day of doing grace, not just saying grace. Listening is hard. And being heard is healing. It is good work. It seems like a good thing to start in on tomorrow.

Feliz día de acción de gracias to you and all your loved ones. We are grateful for each and every one of you.
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Tote Notes
Parsnips: Ugly as all get out, as usual, but nothing a good veggie peeler can't handle. The thing I like least about parsnips is that they don't conform to our 51% art rule ("everything we make and grow has to be at least 51% art"). It's hard to put ugly art in those totes, but I can at least vouch for their flavor. Parsnippy! If you are skeptical about them, please make this dish (you can use delicata instead of sunshine squash if needed): Roasted Winter Squash and Parsnips with Maple Syrup Glaze and Marcona Almonds


It's a staple on our Thanksgiving table, and a great balm for any residual ill feelings I'm harboring towards our parsnip crop.
Don't Forget Your Tote Today!

We delivered ALL Harvest Baskets and Egg Shares to ALL pickup sites today, Wednesday, November 23rd!
  • If your normal pickup is on a Wednesday (Coos Bay and Farm members), there will be no change to your pickup day or time next week.
  • If your normal pickup is on a Saturday (Port Orford and Bandon members), you will pick up on Wednesday, November 23rd. Pickups will start by 10 am. There will be no delivery on Saturday, November 26th.
We'll return to our usual Wednesday/Saturday delivery schedule the week of November 28th. Our final delivery of Harvest Baskets, eggs and tamales will be the week of December 5th.
  • If you pick up on Wednesday, your final pickup will be Wednesday, December 7th.
  • If you pick up on Saturday, your final pickup will be Saturday, December 10th.
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Order Your Holiday Tamales!
Juana is offering tamales by special order for delivery the week of December 5th. Even if you are not a tamale member you're welcome to order. They are $18 a dozen, available in the following savory or sweet flavors:
  • Chicken
  • Pork
  • Vegetarian
  • Mixed Omnivore (4 Chicken, 4 Pork, 4 Veg)
  • Mixed Carnivore (6 Chicken, 6 Pork)
  • Sweet Cinnamon Raisin
Tamales are made fresh to order and then frozen for delivery. They keep for months in the freezer if yo want to stock up for the holidays and wintertime!

Email us your name, pickup site, flavor and quantity by next week, November 30th!
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Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through mid-December we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm.


 
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Recipe of the Week

Butternut Squash Vegducken with Mushroom-Cranberry Stuffing

from epicurious.com
This is the kind of thing I've always wanted to try to make, but never seem to get to. The whole Turducken thing always struck me as borderline obscene, but to think you could do the same thing with all the food we grow on the farm....now that gets my attention. If you give this involved recipe a whirl, let me know how you like it (what better thing to do tomorrow on Thanksgiving Day while it pours 3 inches of rain...).

Serves 6
Active Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 3 hours, 30 minutes

Ingredients

1/2 cup raw pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
1 (8"-long) sweet potato (about 1 pound)
1 (6"-long) parsnip, peeled (about 2 ounces)
1 (9"-long) butternut squash (about 4 1/2 pounds)
4 garlic cloves
1 teaspoon thyme leaves
1 teaspoon paprika
6 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more
16 ounces cremini mushrooms, coarsely chopped, divided
2 large eggs
1 cup finely grated Parmesan
1/2 cup fresh breadcrumbs
1/3 cup dried cranberries
6 tablespoons coarsely chopped parsley, divided
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided, plus more
2 shallots, quartered
2 bay leaves
4 cups homemade or store-bought low-sodium vegetable broth
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 cup dry white wine
Flaky sea salt
Special Equipment
Kitchen twine
 

Preparation

Preheat oven to 350°F. Toast pumpkin seeds on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing once, until fragrant and slightly darkened, 8–10 minutes. Transfer to a plate and let cool.
 
Increase oven temperature to 400°F. Line rimmed baking sheet with foil. Cut potato in half lengthwise. Using a medium-size, quick-release ice cream scoop or heavy spoon, scoop out flesh, leaving a small divot down the center. Reserve potato filling.
 
Place potato halves and parsnip in a large heatproof bowl; cover with plastic wrap. Microwave on high 5 minutes. Carefully check to see if vegetables are fork tender; if not, re-cover and microwave in 1-minute bursts until tender. (Alternatively, roast potato halves and parsnip on a rimmed baking sheet in a 400°F oven until fork-tender, about 50 minutes for parsnip and 30 minutes for potatoes. Let cool slightly.)
 
Meanwhile, cut squash in half lengthwise, remove seeds, and discard. Scoop out flesh, leaving a divot deep enough to fit potato inside and at least a 1/2" border on all sides. Reserve squash filling.
 
Using a fork, pierce insides of squash and potato halves, then pierce parsnip all over.
 
Pulse garlic and thyme in a food processor, scraping down sides as necessary. Add paprika, 1/4 cup oil, and 1 Tbsp. kosher salt and continue to pulse until a thick paste forms, about 1 minute. Transfer to a small bowl.
 
Working in batches, pulse squash and potato filling in food processor until coarsely chopped, about 30 seconds. Transfer to a large bowl. Pulse 4 oz. mushrooms in food processor until coarsely chopped, about 30 seconds. Transfer to same bowl and stir to combine.
 
Heat 1 Tbsp. garlic-oil mixture in a large nonstick skillet over medium until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add vegetable purée and cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture is browned and moisture releases, about 12 minutes. Return to bowl and let cool.
 
Add eggs, Parmesan, breadcrumbs, cranberries, 3 Tbsp. parsley, 1/4 tsp. kosher salt, 1/4 tsp. pepper, and 1/4 cup pumpkin seeds to bowl and mix to combine.
Place squash halves, cut side up, on prepared baking sheet. Using a pastry brush, coat inside with garlic-oil mixture. Using the back of a spoon, press 1 cup vegetable mixture into each half until interior is fully coated.
 
Nestle potato halves, cut side up, inside squash halves. Brush with garlic-oil mixture. Using the back of a spoon, press 6 Tbsp. vegetable mixture into each half until interior is fully coated. Discard remaining vegetable mixture.
Trim parsnip to fit inside 1 potato half. Brush parsnip with garlic-oil mixture and place inside.
 
Cut 3 (18") lengths of kitchen twine. Slip twine under 1 squash half, then top with second squash half so cut sides face each other, and press down to seal. Tightly tie twine around squash to secure. Brush top with garlic-oil mixture, reserving remaining mixture, and season with 1/2 tsp. kosher salt. Wrap squash tightly in foil and place in center of baking sheet. Using 2 loaf pans or small metal bowls turned upside down, keep squash secure on baking sheet.
 
Bake vegducken, carefully flipping halfway through, until squash is tender, 1 hour–1 hour, 20 minutes. Let rest 15 minutes.
 
Meanwhile, heat 1 Tbsp. reserved garlic-oil mixture in a medium pot over medium-low until beginning to brown and smells fragrant, about 30 seconds. Cook shallot, bay leaves, and remaining 12 oz. mushrooms, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms are tender and beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Add broth, bring to a simmer, and cook 30 minutes.
 
Strain mushroom mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl; wipe out pot. Cook flour and remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in pot over medium heat, stirring constantly, until nutty brown and thickened, about 8 minutes.
 
Add wine, bring to a simmer, and cook 3 minutes. Add mushroom broth, 1 Tbsp. parsley, 1/4 tsp. kosher salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper, and return to a simmer. Season to taste.
 
Place vegducken on a cutting board and cut into 1" slices with a serrated knife, transferring to serving plates as you go. Spoon gravy over. Top with remaining 1/4 cup pepitas and 2 Tbsp. parsley. Season with sea salt and serve.
 
Cooks’ Note
The sizes of the squash, sweet potato, and parsnip can vary a bit from the lengths specified; the key is that they fit/nestle into one another. When possible, choose squash that has a neck and bulb and sweet potato that are as uniform in width as possible. If necessary, use 1 medium and 1 small sweet potato and trim, then stagger to fit together into the squash.
 
 
For more recipes, check out these links - all of which are searchable by ingredient:
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/forum/4
Our own collection of recipes, where you can contribute and share your favorites
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/content/recipe-searcher
Our website’s recipe search engine, where you can hunt down recipes by ingredient
 
www.epicurious.com
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
http://info2.farmfreshtoyou.com/index.php?cmd=RE
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient
 
http://helsingfarmcsa.com/recipes.php
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes
Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through mid-December we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm.

Rain or shine!

Fresh Produce, Fruit, Herbs
and Homemade Jam & Hot Sauce

 

 
Copyright © 2016 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp
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Week 25 of 28 from Valley Flora!

Week 25 of 28 from Valley Flora!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser
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In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
  • Tote Notes: Shallots, Kohlrabi, Celeriac and Zanahorias Afectadas
  • Thanksgiving: Menu Planning and Delivery Schedule
  • Recipe of the Week: Kohlrabi, Celeriac & Apple Salad with Caraway

 
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Your Share This Week:
  • Leeks
  • Carrots
  • Shallots
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Celeriac
  • Spaghetti Squash
  • Butternut Squash
On Rotation:
(This means that some pickup sites will receive it this week; others in a future week.)
  • Hakurei Turnips
Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.

The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your share next week:
  • Yellow Onions
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Carrots
  • Rosemary
  • Yellow Potatoes
  • Parsnips
  • Celery
  • Sunshine Squash
  • Pie Pumpkin
  • Sugarloaf Chicory?

No Fruit Shares this Week

 
Valley Flora is on Facebook. Check in for periodic Farmstand and U-pick updates!
Tote Notes: Shallots, Kohlrabi & Celeriac
Shallots: They look a little like red onions, but what's in your tote this week is actually a red shallot. They are more closely related to garlic than they are to onions, but can be used interchangeably with onions. That said, there are plenty of recipes that call explicitly for the milder, more refined flavor of shallots - especially in raw applications like salad dressing. In Asian cuisine you'll often find them deep fried as a condiment (yum) or pickled (also yum).

We put them in your tote this week in advance of Thanksgiving because they add a wonderful element to gravies and stuffing. Under cool, dry conditions they'll store all winter. This stuffing recipe caught my eye, living here in such a cranberry-rich neck of the woods: Skillet Stuffing with Apples, Cranberries and Shallots.


Kohlrabi: They may be big and fearsome, but the kohlrabi in your tote this week is the best tasting variety we grow. I'm an enthusiastic promoter of eating them raw (peeled and sliced into refreshing sticks for dipping or shaved/grated for salads). The closest thing I can liken it to would be jicama: juicy, a little bit sweet and mildly addictive. (This message is approved by my five year old.)

p.s. this week's kohlrabi is a storage variety that keeps for a long, long time in the fridge...

Celeriac: As promised, here's one of the alien-looking fall vegetables we grow (also known as celery root). It needs to be peeled with a paring knife or an aggressive peeler to reveal the creamy white heart within. The flavor is celery-like, but with a nuttier, rootsier edge. If you need a jumping off point to help you use this funny looking orb-of-a-vegetable, I suggest a gateway recipe like this one: Potato and Celery Root Gratin with Leeks. (Who doesn't like anything that has "gratin" in the name?).

When you're ready to probe the celeriac possibilities a little further, there's this: 15 celeriac recipes from Epicurious
.

It keeps for a good while in the fridge as well, certainly long enough to think about incorporating it into your Thanksgiving meal next week.

Zanahorias Afectadas: That's what we call the not-so-perfect carrots in your tote this week: afflicted carrots. After 25 inches of rain in the past month, our fields are a bit soggy. As a result, our winter candy carrots, which we dig fresh from the field each week, are not as beautiful as usual. We hope for your understanding, and that you enjoy the remarkable sweetness of this labor-intensive crop.

Sadly, we're losing a lot of them to rot, so harvest is a bit demoralizing right now. I'd like to think that even with a few blemishes, they're still better than eating bitter old storage carrots out of a 10 pound bag from California. If you disagree, let me know and we'll quit crawling through the mud for them every week. Complaints can be lodged at the Mother Nature Customer Service Center, although I hear they're a bit swamped these days...

 
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Thanksgiving Menu Planning and Delivery Schedule
Next week we feast! The Valley Flora Crystal Ball should be pretty spot on for what's going to be in your Thanksgiving Harvest Basket next week. With that knowledge - and assuming you're not completely locked into a menu tradition - you might give some of these Thanksgiving recipes from Epicurious a glance (a lot of them use ingredients that you'll be getting next Wednesday).

And don't forget, we deliver ALL Harvest Baskets and Egg Shares to ALL pickup sites on Wednesday, November 23rd, next week!
  • If your normal pickup is on a Wednesday (Coos Bay and Farm members), there will be no change to your pickup day or time next week.
  • If your normal pickup is on a Saturday (Port Orford and Bandon members), you will pick up on Wednesday, November 23rd. Pickups will start by 10 am. There will be no delivery on Saturday, November 26th.
  • If you will be out of town for the Thanksgiving holiday and would like us to hold your tote in our cooler until your return, email me your name, pickup site, and the date you plan to pick your tote up from our cooler. We're happy to do it.
We'll return to our usual Wednesday/Saturday delivery schedule the week of November 28th. Our final delivery of Harvest Baskets, eggs and tamales will be the week of December 5th.
  • If you pick up on Wednesday, your final pickup will be Wednesday, December 7th.
  • If you pick up on Saturday, your final pickup will be Saturday, December 10th.
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Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through mid-December we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm.


 
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Recipe of the Week

Kohlrabi, Celeriac and Apple Salad with Caraway

from epicurious.com
 

Makes 4 Servings

Ingredients

1 teaspoon caraway seeds
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
1 medium kohlrabi and 1 medium celery root (celeriac), peeled, thinly sliced on a mandoline
2 small heads frisée, endive or lettuce torn into bite-size pieces (about 6 cups)
1 crisp red apple, thinly sliced
4 tablespoons chopped fresh chives, divided

Preparation

Toast caraway seeds in a small dry skillet over medium heat, tossing often, until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Let cool, then coarsely chop.
 
Whisk caraway, oil, vinegar, and mustard in a large bowl; season with salt and pepper.
 
Add kohlrabi, celeriac, frisée, apple, and 2 tablespoons chives to bowl with dressing and toss to coat; season with salt and pepper.
 
Top salad with remaining 2 tablespoons chives just before serving.
 
For more recipes, check out these links - all of which are searchable by ingredient:
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/forum/4
Our own collection of recipes, where you can contribute and share your favorites
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/content/recipe-searcher
Our website’s recipe search engine, where you can hunt down recipes by ingredient
 
www.epicurious.com
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
http://info2.farmfreshtoyou.com/index.php?cmd=RE
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient
 
http://helsingfarmcsa.com/recipes.php
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes
Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through mid-December we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm.

Rain or shine!

Fresh Produce, Fruit, Herbs
and Homemade Jam & Hot Sauce

 

 
Copyright © 2016 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


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Local Turkeys and Frozen Strawberries!

Local Turkeys and Frozen Strawberries!
Local Pastured Turkeys - Order Now!
Get your holiday turkey from Coastal Hills Pastured Poultry!
Locally raised, pastured, free-range & DELICIOUS!

To order via their webiste:

http://www.coastalhillspoultry.com/

Or Call Diana at 541-347-2812







ALSO AVAILABLE:

Frozen Strawberries

and Apple Cider from

Valley Flora!
  • Strawberries:                     4 lb bags for $25 (limited supply)
  • Cider:                                        $6 per 1/2 gallon jug(4 jug minimum)

Email us to order cider or strawberries and have them delivered to your pickup site!

 

 

Stock up for the Holidays!
KEEP IN TOUCH
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Week 24 of 28 from Valley Flora!

Week 24 of 28 from Valley Flora!
What's Fresh from Valley Flora this Week...
View this email in your browser
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In This Week's Beet Box Newsletter:
  • Surprise
  • Tamales this Week
  • Mark Your Calendars
  • Recipe of the Week: Curried Carrot and Coconut Milk Soup

 
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Your Share This Week:
  • Red Onions
  • Carrots
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Delicata Squash
  • Cabbage
  • Collards
  • Yellow Finn Potatoes
  • Celery
On Rotation:
(This means that some pickup sites will receive it this week; others in a future week.)
  • Peppers and Tomatoes
Please Note: All of our produce is field-rinsed, not washed. We recommend you wash all of your produce before eating it.

The Valley Flora Crystal Ball
What might be in your share next week:
  • Shallots
  • Leeks
  • Carrots
  • Beets?
  • Celeriac
  • Kale
  • Butternut Squash
  • Spaghetti Squash
  • Kohlrabi
  • Turnips?

Fruit Shares this Week:
2 pounds Fuji Apples

 
Valley Flora is on Facebook. Check in for periodic Farmstand and U-pick updates!
Surprise
Whichever candidate you voted for yesterday, I think it's safe to say that the one thing we might be feeling in common today is surprise. As a farmer, I've never imagined there to be something more unpredictable than weather, but yesterday the meteorologists outscored the election forecasters by a long shot. Last night I was unpacking Cleo's backpack after her day at Kindergarten and I found the drawing above. Whether you are elated about the election outcome or heartbroken, it struck me as something worth framing. Thanks be for the five year olds who remind us to see the world through wide, unjaded, hopeful eyes.

The election turned out not to be the only surprise in our day. There were tomatoes, peppers and celery, too, for the Harvest Baskets. The tomatoes and peppers are a little bonus at the tail end of the Solanum season in our greenhouses. The celery was a happy discovery. As of last month I had given up on our celery crop for the year. The plants had reached full size but all of the stalk were dry and spongy, even after a summer of extra love and attention. We gave our celery twice the water, double the fertilizer, and extra compost this year - all things that it loves - in hopes of growing the best celery we've ever seen. Instead we got a whole lotta nothin!

But in the back of mind I was curious to see what the plants would do with the twenty inches of rain we got in October, and yesterday I discovered the answer: they've started to recover! New juicy stalks are growing out of the center of the plant in response to this weather, which makes me suspicious about the drip tape we were using to irrigate them all summer. Maybe the emitters were clogged so they were actually getting half the water instead of double? We still had to strip most of the old stalks away, leaving only the tender blanched heart, but it's a taste at least - enough for soup or seasoning.

With any luck we'll be able to put some larger heads in your totes for stuffing and turkey soup in a couple weeks, so long as we don't get a hard killing frost between now and Thanksgiving. And next year? New drip tape.

 
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Tamales this Week!
If you are a Tamale Share member, don't forget to get your bag out of the marked blue coolers at your pickup site this week.
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Mark Your Calendars
There are two important dates to put on your calendar:
  1. The week of Thanksgiving we deliver ALL Harvest Baskets and eggs to ALL pickup sites on WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd.
    • If your normal pickup is on a Wednesday (Coos Bay and Farm members), there will be no change to your pickup day or time that week.
    • If your normal pickup is on a Saturday (Port Orford and Bandon members), you will pick up on Wednesday, November 23rd. Pickups will start by 10 am. There will be no delivery on Saturday, November 26th.
    • If you will be out of town for the Thanksgiving holiday and would like us to hold your tote in our cooler until your return, email me your name, pickup site, and the date you plan to pick your tote up from our cooler. We're happy to do it.
  2. Our final delivery of Harvest Baskets, eggs and tamales will be the week of December 5th.
    • If you pick up on Wednesday, your final pickup will be Wednesday, December 7th.
    • If you pick up on Saturday, your final pickup will be Saturday, December 10th.
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Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through mid-December we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm.


 
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Recipe of the Week

Curried Carrot and Coconut Milk Soup

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1015543-curried-carrot-and-coconut-soup
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • ½ medium onion, roughly chopped
  • ¾ pound carrots, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch coins
  • 1 teaspoon peeled, grated fresh ginger
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin, to taste
  • ½ teaspoon ground tumeric, to taste
  • ½ teaspoon ground coriander, to taste
  • Pinch cayenne pepper
  • 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
  • Juice from ½ lime
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Cilantro if you have it
Preparation
  1. Heat the butter until the foam subsides. Add the diced chopped onions, sprinkle with salt, stir to coat with butter. Add the chopped carrots along with the spices. Stir and cook until softened, about 10 minutes.
  2. Add the stock; there should be enough to cover the vegetables. Bring the pot to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and continue cooking until the carrots are cooked through, about 10 to 15 minutes.
  3. If you have an immersion blender, purée the soup in the pot. If not, wait until the soup cools slightly, and purée in a food processor. Add enough coconut milk (and a little more stock or water if necessary) to bring the soup to the consistency you want. Adjust the seasoning (depending on the stock you use, you may need more or less salt), and lime juice to taste. Garnish and serve.
 
For more recipes, check out these links - all of which are searchable by ingredient:
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/forum/4
Our own collection of recipes, where you can contribute and share your favorites
 
http://www.valleyflorafarm.com/content/recipe-searcher
Our website’s recipe search engine, where you can hunt down recipes by ingredient
 
www.epicurious.com
A vast collection of recipes, searchable by one or multiple ingredients
 
http://info2.farmfreshtoyou.com/index.php?cmd=RE
A storehouse of recipes, searchable by ingredient
 
http://helsingfarmcsa.com/recipes.php
A Washington farm that has a good collection of seasonal recipes
Fall Farmstand Hours

From now through mid-December we will be open every Wednesday from 10 am to 2 pm.

Rain or shine!

Fresh Produce, Fruit, Herbs
and Homemade Jam & Hot Sauce

 

 
Copyright © 2016 Valley Flora, All rights reserved.


unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences 

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp
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